More Taking the Pulse

Taking the Pulse looked at public opinion on aboriginal issues and the economy in Saskatchewan.

First, aboriginal issues (pdf):

  1. Aboriginal people make an important contribution to Saskatchewan’s economy today Agree 57% Disagree 39%
  2. Aboriginal people will make an important contribution to Saskatchewan’s future economy. Agree 74% Disagree 22%
  3. Public investments in Aboriginal education pay off in the long run. Agree 72% Disagree 24%
  4. Aboriginal self-government is important to the future of Saskatchewan. Agree 45% Disagree 49%
  5. Aboriginal people do not pay enough taxes in Saskatchewan. Agree 63% Disagree 24%
  6. Governments need to ensure that on-reserve housing is properly funded. Agree 71% Disagree 24%

Next, the economy (pdf):

  1. How optimistic are you about the possibility of young people finding goods jobs in Saskatchewan. Optimistic 87% Pessimistic 13%
  2. Home ownership is attainable for everyone in Saskatchewan as long as they work hard, save money and spend wisely. Agree 68% Disagree 30%
  3. What is the minimum level of education needed to be a productive citizen in today’s knowledge-based, globally connected world. Bachelor’s University Degree or trade diploma 37%
  4. The Saskatchewan Government should NOT reduce workers’ collective bargaining rights. Agree 68% Disagree 21%
  5. The Saskatchewan government should reduce the provincial sales tax and replace the revenue by increasing provincial income taxes. 24% Agree 69% Disagree
  6. The Saskatchewan government should raise the income tax rate on high income earners in order to fund programs to bring low income individuals above the poverty level. Agree 69% Disagree 28%

References:
Keatings, T., Innes, R., Laliberte, R., Howe, E. Taking the Pulse of Saskatchewan 2012: Aboriginal Issues in Saskatchewan. (Saskatoon, Sask.: Social Sciences Research Laboratories, University of Saskatchewan, 2012).

Keatings, T., Jones, K., Gilchrist, D., Huq, M., Walker, R. Taking the Pulse of Saskatchewan 2012: Saskatchewan’s Economy. (Saskatoon, Sask.: Social Sciences Research Laboratories, University of Saskatchewan, 2012).

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